7.25.2008

slowbeat day - sorta

[warning: not as sarcastic, jokey, or bitchy as I usually write - but we can handle it, we’re all big girls around here, right?]

A slowbeat day. Spouse is home from working the week in another city. When he’s home for the weekends, I tend to mentally and physically zonk out. I think it’s the knowledge that someone else is here, and it’s not all on my shoulders for now. I can take a break. Don’t get me wrong, I love working on this land, and I enjoy the quiet of my own company. It’s just a relief to know there’s some backup.

Today’s plan is to go into town to do the week’s grocery shopping (critter and human), and return the wrong-sized pantry shelves and brackets for the right-sized ones. I’ll then get the pantry shelving up, finally. The house has been in chaos for the last few days. Who knew we had so much stuff packed away in that tiny pantry space? Spouse will bring in the old mini-frige we’ve had sitting in the storage room upstairs, and we’ll finally have more shelf space to organize the food, crockery, and (ahem) alcohol. The mini-frige will be used to store the animal goods: medicines, green feed, and the like.

Tomorrow we’re getting a metric sh*tload of 3.5’ goat fencing to put up around the property. We still have about 400’ of brush left to clear back from the fence line. I imagine Spouse’s aunt & I will do the clearing, while the guys pull fence. The cedar is thick around these parts, and we’ve had to cut back branches and brush with a chain-saw. I love working with the chain-saw and clearing, and doing my best to keep things aesthetically pleasing. It’s like sculpture, but without the pressure of making “art”.

Sunday, we’ll rest. Sort of. Critter care never stops.

Off to sit with the pups until morning rush-hour traffic near the city calms down.

[pic: Nutmeg the Cubalaya on my shoulder. The Cubalayas are the sweetest chickens I've ever had the pleasure of meeting. Good natured and curious. They're considered an ornamental breed here in the U.S., but Cubans have been using them for meat and egg production for years.]

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